Brenda's Blog

All articles from the 'Personal Branding' Category

When Risking Failure is a Good Thing

How can failing ever be a good thing? The best leaders know that if you aren’t risking failure at least part of the time, you’re playing it so safe that no one on your team is learning and growing. “Failing small” can be a great way for everyone in your company to learn. After all, isn’t that how you learned the best lessons in your own career?

Sounds intriguing but not sure how to put this into action?

-          Allow enough leeway in projects so that if small failures occur, you have time to recover, learn specific lessons from the failures, and get back on track.

-          If you’re concerned about your employees making costly mistakes, determine the points at which you need to influence the project’s outcome the most. Then, set up specific times to meet with your direct reports, either by date or by completion of certain steps (check out the “metered with milestones” delegation style in Would YOU Want to Work For YOU™?). In that case, if something is truly off track, you can realize it, say something, coach them through it, and have enough time to make a correction.

Playing it 100% safe in business is not how the most successful companies have gotten where they are today. You have to step out and take calculated risks now and then in order to get big rewards. What risks will YOU take today?

Brenda Bence Bio

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Development is an Ongoing Task

 

professional-development

In my recently released book – “Would You Want to Work For You?” How to Build an Executive Leadership Brand that Inspires Loyalty and Drives Employee Performance – I argue that building people is simply part of your job as a leader, and I offer strategies for developing your employees on a day-to-day basis.

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Where do you place your focus as a leader?

The focus of your attention affects everything you do as a leader. Where you choose to place your focus and how you choose to use your time says as much about you as a leader as any other indicator.

A model called the “Five Levels of Focus” gives you a simple but powerful framework for this. Created by Australian author and consultant David Rock, applying the Five Levels of Focus helps leaders choose where to place their energy and attention at any point in time. According to this model, there are five distinct levels: (1) Vision, (2) Planning, (3) Details, (4) Problems, and (5) Drama.

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Would you rather be liked or respected?

 Liked vs Respected

As leaders, we want to be liked, but we also want to be respected. Can we be both? Not only do I believe it’s possible, but I’ve personally witnessed many leaders walking a beautifully balanced line between the two.

Accomplishing both isn’t always easy, though. What happens when the balance tips too far in one direction or the other?

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Quiz: What is the #1 cause of employee turnover?

 

Bad-management

To answer this question, take a moment to reflect on the best and the worst jobs you’ve ever had. What role did your boss play in how you felt about those positions? If you’re like a large number of the leaders I’ve worked with, the best jobs you’ve had involved a great boss who spent time with you and taught you a lot. Your worst jobs, on the other hand, probably involved a boss you didn’t like that much—someone who micromanaged your activities or put you down.

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Put an Employee in Your Shoes

In my upcoming book – Would You Want to Work For You? – I discuss employee development strategies and how to build your people without losing precious time. I also talk about the importance of receiving feedback from your team.

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Does your company “get” you?

1 team(4)

Communication is everything, so if people aren’t understanding your message, you may as well be speaking to the wall. This recent Forbes.com article, “When CEOs Talk Strategy, 70% of the Company Doesn’t Get it” outlines the issues that cause miscommunication and misalignment and ways to make sure your people “get” you and your message.

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Are you a good listener?

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As leaders, we often overlook listening skills. After all, aren’t leaders supposed to tell people what to do instead of listening? Aren’t great leaders supposed to be heard instead of hearing what others have to say?

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What makes a leader inspirational and motivational?

I explore this topic in my upcoming book- Would You Want to Work For You? Meanwhile, Forbes.com has a great article on the subject to give you a primer on the traits that inspirational and motivational leaders tend to have in common. How would you rate yourself on these attributes?

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How “likable” are you as a leader?

handshake example

Being “liked” isn’t everything when it comes to leadership, but it definitely matters – especially if you want to be the kind of boss others want to work for. It isn’t about being popular, though. It’s about retaining the best employees, inspiring others to better productivity and creativity, and getting the kind of results that help you rise in your career.

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